Browsers statistics

Microsoft has been leading internet browsers war up till now, facing tough competition from fire fox.
Internet Explorer – 59.9%
Firefox – 24.5%
Chrome – 6.7%
Safari – 4.7%
Opera – 2.3%
Opera Mini – 0.7%
Netscape – 0.46%
Mozilla – 0.16%
Flock – 0.06%
Lunascape – 0.04%
Source: Net Applications

No Mac App Store

Just like iPhone app store, apple fans have been anticipating a similar thing for Mac OS X, but to utter surprise, nothing like that is in pipe line.

Apple’s CEO steve jobs replied NOPE to a Mac software developer, Fernando Valente when he inquired about upcoming Mac store. He emailed the Apple CEO questioning him on whether or not such a service would become a reality. After the email was sent, Valente, like many others, was not expecting a response. But much to his surprise only a few hours after sending it, he received one. The email from Steve Jobs was brief and to the point, simply stating that “nope,” no such service is on the way.

It has been a widespread rumor in forums that whether apple would be launching any thing like app store for its Mac OS. Now it has been confirmed that nothing like that is going to happen.

iPad Keyboard Dock

The iPad Keyboard Dock combines a dock for charging your iPad with a full-size keyboard, which includes special keys that activate iPad features. The dock has a rear dock connector port, which lets you connect to an electrical outlet using the USB Power Adapter, sync to your computer, and use accessories like the iPad Camera Connection Kit. An audio line out port lets you connect to a stereo or powered speakers (audio cable sold separately)

The keyboard measures 11 inches wide and 4.5 inches deep, and stands just 0.65 inch tall toward the back, sloping down to a mere 0.25 inch at the spacebar. The white plastic dock fused to the back of the keyboard gives the accessory a total depth of 7.25 inches.

IPad’s keyboard become irritating when one has to move a cursor from one position to another position. For example, if after writing a document you want to edit the first two lines, you have to touch IPad and take the cursor to that position unlike using mouse facitlity.

Which MacBook Pro is right for Me?

From:- http://www.apple.com/macbookpro/specs-compare.html

Below chart will help you up in comparing different flavors of MacBook Pro and analyzing which one suits you!

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13-inch MacBook Pro

The high-performance notebook for everyone. From $1199.

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15-inch MacBook Pro

The mobile computing powerhouse.
From $1799

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17-inch MacBook Pro

The ultimate mobile studio.
From $2299

$1199

2.4GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor

250GB 5400-rpm hard drive

NVIDIA GeForce 320M with 256MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory

$1499

2.66GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor

320GB 5400-rpm hard drive

NVIDIA GeForce 320M with 256MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory

Processor Processor
2.4GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor

3MB L2 cache

2.66GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor

3MB L2 cache

Graphics Graphics
NVIDIA GeForce 320M with 256MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory NVIDIA GeForce 320M with 256MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory
Memory and Storage Memory and Storage
4GB memory

250GB 5400-rpm hard drive

4GB memory

320GB 5400-rpm hard drive

Display Display
13.3-inch LED-backlit glossy widescreen display

1280 by 800 pixels

13.3-inch LED-backlit glossy widescreen display

1280 by 800 pixels

Battery Battery
Up to 10 hours (wireless web browsing)

Built-in lithium-polymer 63.5 watt-hour

Up to 10 hours (wireless web browsing)

Built-in lithium-polymer 63.5 watt-hour

Other Features Other Features
Precision aluminum unibody

MagSafe power port

Mini DisplayPort

Two USB 2.0 ports

One FireWire 800 port

SD card slot

iSight camera

Multi-Touch trackpad

Full-size, backlit keyboard

8x SuperDrive

Precision aluminum unibody

MagSafe power port

Mini DisplayPort

Two USB 2.0 ports

One FireWire 800 port

SD card slot

iSight camera

Multi-Touch trackpad

Full-size, backlit keyboard

8x SuperDrive

$1799

2.4GHz Intel Core i5 processor

320GB 5400-rpm hard drive

Intel HD Graphics

NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M graphics processor with 256MB GDDR3 memory

$1999

2.53GHz Intel Core i5 processor

500GB 5400-rpm hard drive

Intel HD Graphics

NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M graphics processor with 256MB GDDR3 memory

$2199

2.66GHz Intel Core i7 processor

500GB 5400-rpm hard drive

Intel HD Graphics

NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M graphics processor with 512MB GDDR3 memory

Processor Processor Processor
2.4GHz Intel Core i5 processor

3MB L3 cache

2.53GHz Intel Core i5 processor

3MB L3 cache

2.66GHz Intel Core i7 processor

4MB L3 cache

Graphics Graphics Graphics
Intel HD Graphics with 256MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory

NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M graphics processor with 256MB GDDR3 memory and automatic graphics switching

Intel HD Graphics with 256MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory

NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M graphics processor with 256MB GDDR3 memory and automatic graphics switching

Intel HD Graphics with 256MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory

NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M graphics processor with 512MB GDDR3 memory and automatic graphics switching

Memory and Storage Memory and Storage Memory and Storage
4GB memory

320GB 5400-rpm hard drive

4GB memory

500GB 5400-rpm hard drive

4GB memory

500GB 5400-rpm hard drive

Display Display Display
15.4-inch LED-backlit glossy widescreen display

1440 by 900 pixels

High-resolution 1680-by-1050 glossy or antiglare option available

15.4-inch LED-backlit glossy widescreen display

1440 by 900 pixels

High-resolution 1680-by-1050 glossy or antiglare option available

15.4-inch LED-backlit glossy widescreen display

1440 by 900 pixels

High-resolution 1680-by-1050 glossy or antiglare option available

Battery Battery Battery
Up to 8-9 hours (wireless web browsing)

Built-in lithium-polymer 77.5 watt-hour

Up to 8-9 hours (wireless web browsing)

Built-in lithium-polymer 77.5 watt-hour

Up to 8-9 hours (wireless web browsing)

Built-in lithium-polymer 77.5 watt-hour

Other Features Other Features Other Features
Precision aluminum unibody

MagSafe power port

Mini DisplayPort

Two USB 2.0 ports

One FireWire 800 port

SD card slot

iSight camera

Multi-Touch trackpad

Full-size, backlit keyboard

8x SuperDrive

Precision aluminum unibody

MagSafe power port

Mini DisplayPort

Two USB 2.0 ports

One FireWire 800 port

SD card slot

iSight camera

Multi-Touch trackpad

Full-size, backlit keyboard

8x SuperDrive

Precision aluminum unibody

MagSafe power port

Mini DisplayPort

Two USB 2.0 ports

One FireWire 800 port

SD card slot

iSight camera

Multi-Touch trackpad

Full-size, backlit keyboard

8x SuperDrive

$2299

2.53GHz Intel Core i5 processor

500GB 5400-rpm hard drive

Intel HD Graphics

NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M graphics processor with 512MB GDDR3 memory

Processor
2.53GHz Intel Core i5 processor; 2.66GHz Intel Core i7 option available

3MB L3 cache

Graphics
Intel HD Graphics with 256MB DDR3 SDRAM shared with main memory

NVIDIA GeForce GT 330M graphics processor with 512MB GDDR3 memory and automatic graphics switching

Memory and Storage
4GB memory

500GB 5400-rpm hard drive

Display
17-inch high-resolution LED-backlit glossy widescreen display

1920 by 1200 pixels

Battery
Up to 8-9 hours (wireless web browsing)

Built-in lithium-polymer 95 watt-hour

Other Features
Precision aluminum unibody

MagSafe power port

Mini DisplayPort

Three USB 2.0 ports

One FireWire 800 port

ExpressCard/34 slot

iSight camera

Multi-Touch trackpad

Full-size, backlit keyboard

8x SuperDrive

Create a Custom User Template in Snow Leopard

Setting up your OS to your liking can be an art for some. What if you need to set up Snow Leopard to present every user with the same look and settings? By following these steps you can have every user who logs into the machine receive the same look, feel and preferences that you desire. What we’ll be doing is creating a new user, setting it up to look how we want, then copying the settings so every new user will get those preferences.

Setting Everything Up

  1. Login under your admin account and open up Accounts pane in System Preferences.
  2. Click the + to create a new Standard user.
  3. As an example, we’ll use the name testuser.
  4. Log off and log back in as testuser.
  5. Set everything up the way you want. I customized the Dock, Safari’s home page and the Finder preferences.
  6. When you are done customizing, log off the testuser account.

Copying the Files

  1. Login under your admin account.
  2. Navigate to the /System/Library folder in Finder.
  3. Right-click on the User Template folder and choose Get info.
  4. By default, you cannot browse this folder. Change the permissions so Everyone has Read & Write permissions.
  5. Now we can open up the User Template folder & copy the English.lproj folder to your desktop. This will be our backup copy in case we want to restore it back.
  6. Open up Terminal and navigate to the User Template folder. cd /System/Library/User Template/English.lproj
  7. Copy the testuser folder over, which will replace the defaults. You may get errors about some files that can’t be replaced. I haven’t seen it cause any issues though. sudo cp -R ~testuser/* . sudo cp -R ~testuser/.* .
  8. Change the permissions for the User Template folder back so everyone has No Access again.

Test it Out

  1. Create a new user to verify everything worked. I used the name testuser2.
  2. Log off as admin and log back in as testuser2.
  3. You will now see your customized settings. These will be used for all new users created on the system from this point on.

Conclusion

To put everything back the way it was, log in as admin and copy the English.lproj backup file on your desktop back to the /System/Library/User Template folder.

If you have a lab of Macs but aren’t using Open Directory, this is a nice solution to maintain some control over the OS presentation. This change will only affect new users. It has no effect on existing users, so keep that in mind. If you start getting constant requests for more customizations similar to this, setup a Snow Leopard Server and start using Workgroup Manager. The changes can be much easier to implement but the Server solution has a larger price-tag for that convenience.

iPhone Gains Gaming Market Revenue Share

Software market research firm Flurry Analytics has posted some interesting information about where Apple’s iPhone stands in regards to the gaming market at large. The report also includes details about how the iPhone is stacking up in the mobile market against its two major rivals, the Nintendo DS and the Sony PSP.

In 2008, Apple’s iPhone OS accounted for only one percent of the overall gaming market, compared to 20 percent for other portable games, and 79 percent for console. 2009 saw a definite swing towards portable gaming overall, with Apple alone reaping about half of the benefit of that shift.

Apple’s overall share of video game software sales climbed to five percent in 2009, which represents an impressive 500 percent growth rate for the year. The general portable market, which seems to include not only the Nintendo DS and PSP, but also other mobile gaming platforms like cellular devices, grew by five percentage points as well, taking 24 percent of the market in 2009. The home console market, by comparison, dropped to just 71 percent. The numbers seem to indicate a growing portable market, of which Apple is currently taking the lion’s share.

According to Flurry Analytics’ estimates, using information from the NPD group, which details gaming revenue, the market overall took in $11 billion in 2008, and had a lightly less lucrative 2009, taking in only $9.9 billion. That means Apple’s take grew from $115 million in 2008 to somewhere around $500 million in 2009. With the introduction of the iPad in 2010, that number stands grow at an even faster rate as a whole new market segment is opened up to App Store gaming.

Zooming in on how the iPhone is doing relative to its two strongest competitors in portable gaming, the Nintendo DS and the PlayStation Portable, we see an even more dramatic picture of tremendous growth. Where the iPhone accounted for only five percent of the revenue share of the three platforms in 2008, in 2009 it took 19 percent. That means that it surpassed the PSP, which fell from 20 percent to 11 percent market share year over year. The DS stayed strong at 70 percent in 2009, but that still represents a fall of 5 percentage points from 2008.

The PSP is in big trouble, but it also looks like Nintendo may only be doing better because it had such a hefty head start to begin with. Recently, Apple announced that its next generation portable console, the Nintendo 3DS, is set for release in the not-too-distant future, so that could help its prospects. The PSP, on the other hand, had a very disappointing year with the release of the PSP Go, which wasn’t very well received, and no plans have been announced about the device’s next iteration as of yet.

Apple’s iPhone platform, on the other hand, is set to make some major leaps forward this year. There’s the very concrete and tangible benefit the iPad will have when it comes out early next month, compared to Nintendo’s vague plans regarding a new device somewhere on the horizon. Then there’s the near-certainty that Apple will be releasing a new iPhone in late Spring/early Summer, which should bring at the very least better processor power and graphics rendering for more impressive and ambitious games.

Therein lies Apple’s main advantage, besides its appeal to casual gamers: new hardware every 12 months, at least. The iPhone, iPod touch, and presumably the iPad, too, all get annual refreshes at the very least. And those refreshes often mean more muscle under the hood, which translates to more for game developers to work with. Significant performance updates to Sony’s and Nintendo’s platforms are few and far between.

The iPhone platform is still struggling to find purchase with core gamers, but I think the iPad, especially with its support for Bluetooth keyboards, might finally make significant inroads with that crowd. Watch for 2010 to be the year Apple dominates portable gaming.

IPad or Netbook?

With all of the netbook hoopla, it’s worth remembering that Apple really hasn’t filled the need for a full-featured, really small laptop. With Steve Jobs saying that they simply can’t build a cheap netbook without sacrificing quality, Mac lovers who still want one are left, quite literally, to their own devices.

myMacNetbook.com is here to help — it has all of the latest news about getting OS X to run on a netbook in one place. It also has a valuable chart that shows you which netbooks work best with OS X, and links to the software that you will need to use in order to get a netbook up and running with our favorite operating system, and valuable, step-by-step directions for turning a netbook into your OS X dream machine.

The compatibility chart assumes that you want to install Snow Leopard, and shows you which features will and won’t work on a particular piece of hardware. As of today, it looks like there are 10 different netbooks that are completely happy with an OS X install. I’ll probably hold out for generation 2 of the iPad, even though I am very tempted to buy one now. On the other hand, getting something smaller than my MacBook Pro that does everything that I need it to do, and for a lower or similar cost, sounds pretty sweet too.

How many of you have already gone with an OS X netbook, or are planning to go that direction rather than getting the iPad?

Working on the go will be top iPad use

A new survey by Sybase says that 2,443 of adults with a mobile phone, when polled, claim that their number one use case for an iPad would be working while out and about. 52.3% of those polled say they would work from a device like the iPad, 48.2% said they would use it to watch movies and television, and 35.4% said that they would use it to play games. Those are some interesting numbers — we’ve already heard that a full third of potential iPad users would use it to read books (though of course for some people, reading books would be considered work), and we’ve even heard that 44% of the iPhone apps being tested so far are actually games.

So basically, no one has any idea what we’ll be doing with our iPads when we actually get them. No, my guess is that people suspect that they will use an iPad for working, but in practice, they’ll use it more for what Apple expects them to use it for: games and consuming media. It could also be that “work” apps take longer to develop on the iPad, which would explain why we’re seeing games made when most users believe they’ll be working. But of course, we’ll have to see — it’s possible that we may not know the main use for the iPad yet, as even Apple seems to be torn on what the real focus of the computer will be.